Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University) - 57-63 Royal Parade. PARKVILLE [Walking Melbourne Building Information]
Walking Melbourne

Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University): 57-63 Royal Parade, PARKVILLE

Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University)

Click for full size

Building Profile

Name : Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University)
Past Names : University of Melbourne

Location

Address: 57-63 Royal Parade
City: PARKVILLE

Postcode: 3052


Construction Details

Built: 1882 - 1927
Original use: Education
Current use: Education

number of floors : 3

Built in the Victorian period in the Neo-Gothic style

Notable features

History

Janet Clarke Hall's current layout was built in five stages. The original section, designed in 1890 by Charles D'Ebro is the central section that incorporates the two gable roofs facing east and two side gables facing north and south. D'Ebro was a trained engineer, who immigrated to Australia from London but established himself in private practice as an architect. The builder was Thos. Corley. This section is the central portion of a never completed larger design and is a flamboyant interpretation of the Gothic style in red brick with stone dressings.

The second stage, known as the Manifold Wing, the north wing, was designed by the architects Blackett Forster and Craig in 1927. This is a Collegiate Gothic style building with red brick surfaces relieved by stucco dressings and castellated parapet. Dominant elements include the chimney shaft and stacks, rainwater heads and downpipes and the Trinity College crest. The third stage, known as the Traill Wing was designed by the architects A. & K. Henderson in 1930. It draws its inspiration from the northern wing and like the north wing it extends east and away from the University Avenue. Within the south wing is located the dining room, which was added to the Traill Wing by Mockridge Stahle and Mitchell in 1974. In c.1956, the Joske Wing (fourth stage) was added, linking the Manifold wing with the original 1890 building. The Scandlebury Wing (fifth stage), designed by architects Forsyth and Richardson, was built in 1964. This section of the building is uncompromisingly modern in style, but is compatible in terms of height, scale and general appearance.

The building is symmetrical about the central axis through the main entrance, which is flanked by bay windows. The picturesque qualities of the richly decorated facade are heightened by the steeply sloping, slated gable roof; gable ends surmounted by stone finials; pinnacles; a complex pattern of dressed stone and red brick surfaces with foliated sections and predominantly lancet arched windows with cusping, trefoil motifs. The interior is marked by impressive timber panelled ceilings and arched openings. The dining room is carefully detailed and designed to blend in with the original central section. All other rooms display many original features, such as detailed joinery and fireplaces. The principal's apartment is also well preserved. Most of its original detailing and layout is still evident except for some small modifications for modern living.

Originally known as the Janet Clarke Building, its name was changed to Janet Clarke Hall in 1921. In 1961 the College broke its link with Trinity and declared itself independent. Janet Clarke Hall is associated with Dr Alexander Leeper, the first warden of Trinity College, who had the idea of creating the first women?s residential college in the University of Melbourne and Australia in 1872. The college took its name from Lady Janet Clarke, the wife of Sir William Clarke. She was the benefactor of the College. Over the years the College has accommodated many distinguished scholars including Dorothy Wardle (nee Scantlebury) who became principal of Toorak College, Margery Herring, Enid Joske, who became principals at Janet Clarke Hall, Dorothea Baynes and Vera Jennings, who taught at Melbourne University.

Architect: Charles DEbro




Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University) is classified by:

Did you find what you were looking for ?
Discuss Janet Clarke Hall (Melbourne University) in the Walking Melbourne Forum



Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Index
Web Hosting by RipeFruit