Melbourne & Australian Architecture Topics

A place to talk about Australian Architecture, Heritage & Planning Issues
It is currently 24 Oct 2017, 02:19




All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Barangaroo - Sydney
PostPosted: 17 Apr 2008, 17:22 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 13 Sep 2002, 00:36
Posts: 3940
looks pretty stale.
Like some of the plans for New York and Chicago in the late 1950s.

Quote:
Iemma rebuffs Gehl criticisms, flags new ferry hub
Image
An image from the Government's concept plan for East Darling Harbour.

Barangaroo concept plan
Animation: See how the former Hungry Mile site would look.

Hungry Mile wasteland warning
Jano Gibson
April 17, 2008 - 11:53AM

Premier Morris Iemma has dismissed concerns from internationally respected Danish urban planner Jan Gehl that the Hungry Mile development at East Darling Harbour would be "fearsome at night" and a "wasteland" on weekends and public holidays.

The Premier also revealed he was considering locating a new ferry terminal hub, possibly as big as Circular Quay, at the southern end of the historic 22-hectare stevedoring site, which has been rebranded "Barangaroo".

"It will be one of the most magic spots in the world," said Mr Iemma, who today announced the development of the headland park would be brought forward by about two years.

The Government will provide about $150 million in forward funding for its development, which will begin in the financial year 2009/10.

A light rail system linking Barangaroo with the existing line near the Entertainment Centre was also under consideration, he said.

The Barangaroo development will eventually become a financial district where about 16,000 people work and 1500 live.

Professor Gehl, who was engaged by the City of Sydney council to advise it on how to make Sydney a people-friendly place, and who is helping New York revamp its public spaces, yesterday slammed the Barangaroo project.

A lack of nearby residents, a parkland too large for its own good and a location too difficult to reach, would make the area dangerous and deserted, he said.

"I've called it 'docklands' at one end and 'wastelands' at the other end," Professor Gehl told the Herald, referring to the "awful office tower area" at London's redeveloped Docklands.

"I don't believe it will be a success. It's against all we know about recreational patterns in the 21st century."

The amount of parkland should be retained, he said, but divided into smaller sections interspersed with low-rise residential development, restaurants and canals.

"I would love to call it Little Venice over there in the future."

He said the City of Sydney's vision of creating a large park at Darling Harbour, where there would be far greater residential and student activity, would work better than the current Barangaroo plans.

Mr Iemma said Professor Gehl was entitled to his views but Barangaroo would "be a place that people love and work and come here for enjoyment".

An international advertising campaign seeking expressions of interest for the first stage of the commercial and residential redevelopment of the site will kick off in the next few weeks. Expressions of interest will also be sought for the design of the park in the near future.

"Our goal is to find innovative companies to help us create one of the world's most environmentally sustainable precincts on prime waterfront land," Mr Iemma said.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Dec 2009, 13:55 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member

Joined: 02 Nov 2008, 16:57
Posts: 449
This article appeared online in the Sydney Morning Herald 22 December 2009.
http://www.smh.com.au/national/grand-sl ... -la26.html

Quote:
Grand slam for Barangaroo's grand plan: harbour makeover looks like 'worst of Dubai'
MATTHEW MOORE AND PAUL BIBBY
December 22, 2009
THE State Government is poised to waive planning rules so a developer can fill in part of the harbour to build the city's biggest hotel in what critics have dubbed the worst of ''Dubai architecture''.
Under the agreement negotiated by the Government's Barangaroo Delivery Authority, Lend Lease will construct a 150-metre-long peninsula extending into East Darling Harbour as a base on which to erect the 230-metre-tall hotel.
The authority's chief executive, John Tabart, also revealed that Lend Lease had been allowed to increase the floor space in the building by 15 per cent in addition to the 30 per cent rise allowed last year in an effort to make the project financially viable.

By allowing Lend Lease to build out from the existing shoreline, guests will be able to enjoy views to the Opera House.
Although the concept plan for Barangaroo does not allow reclaiming the harbour or building higher than 180 metres, the authority has approved Lend Lease's non-complying design on the grounds that it is so good it is likely to win planning approval when a development application is lodged.
Sydney has previously filled in its waterways for projects including the airport's third runway, but architects warned it was another thing to allow a developer to build a hotel in the harbour.
''There's not really any excuse for intruding on publicly owned water. The precedent that sets is not a very good one,'' said Peter Webber, a former NSW government architect and emeritus professor of architecture at the University of Sydney.
Philip Thalis, who won the original design competition on redeveloping Barangaroo, said it was ''privatising the harbour''.
''It's a catastrophic mistake for Sydney. It's like letting them do that at Circular Quay. It makes the Cahill Expressway look positively benign … It's the worst of Dubai 'look at me' architecture,'' Mr Thalis said.
But the chairman of the authority's design review panel, a former government architect, Chris Johnson, said the building had ''a good pizazz about it'', and while it was not good to fill in the harbour this was ''the exception to the rule''.
He said his approval was on the basis that the building was ''incredibly well designed and incredibly accessible to the public'', and that it should include viewing platforms and a series of other public spaces that could be ''a bit like the Ivy in George Street''.
The proposal was warmly embraced by former prime minister Paul Keating, who has fought successfully for the northern headland to be returned to its pre-settlement shape. ''The scheme is a scheme right outside the paradigm - this is what Sydney needs,'' he said. ''It needs to be grand to do the job.
''What Lord [Richard] Rogers [the architect] has offered is a fan structure that breaks the geometry of the grid and which has at its foot a hotel as an exclamation mark.''
Developer groups were enthusiastic about the plan to fill in part of the harbour.
''We do support the plan for the infill of the harbour,'' said Stephen Albin, NSW chief executive of the Urban Development Institute of Australia.
The acting head of the NSW chapter of the Property Council of Australia, Glenn Byres, said: ''This is the imaginative, iconic design that the site deserved.''


I suppose the most imaginative aspect is creating new waterfront land rather than purchasing what exists today. The idea of filling in the harbour isn't so bad but the building that is proposed doesn't look that groundbreaking.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Dec 2009, 21:02 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 13 Sep 2002, 00:36
Posts: 3940
funny how just a decade ago Dubai architecture was the toast of the world. Now it is ugly because it is synonymous with overindulgence. Sounds like the 1880s all over again.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Dec 2009, 23:25 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member

Joined: 02 Nov 2008, 16:57
Posts: 449
I suspect you're right, there seems to be a rising hatred against public indulgences. Most of the buildings I have liked could have been easily considered overindulgent by contemporaries when they were built. The Roman and Greek ruins, The Vatican and many mansions are all over-indulgent and I love them for being built. Alternatively those revolving skyscrapers just seem like a maintenance disaster to my mind.
I find the article a bit poor really - the throwaway line about Dubai architecture is not ascribed to anyone so I'd think it was the editor's personal opinion more than anything.
Paul Keating is apparently still talking rubbish although that could be the editorial licence at work there too.
Quote:
''The scheme is a scheme right outside the paradigm - this is what Sydney needs,''

The definition of paradigm was the reason the Barangaroo Delivery Authority was created one year ago wasn't it?
http://blog.futuredesignsydney.com/2008 ... board.html

I find it strange that the NSW Government's own authority created to deliver a good design outcome for the city is looking to approve a project that doesn't comply with the guidelines. Building out on the water is bound to cause some trouble for the landowners who will have their view blocked out. Imagine paying top dollar for a front-row seat at a concert only to have a person come and stand in front of you - legally.
Quote:
The authority's chief executive, John Tabart, also revealed that Lend Lease had been allowed to increase the floor space in the building by 15 per cent in addition to the 30 per cent rise allowed last year in an effort to make the project financially viable.

OK, so 100% plus 30% = 130% plus 15% of that = 149.5% of the original floorspace - these guys should be negotiating for the unions.
Quote:
But the chairman of the authority's design review panel, a former government architect, Chris Johnson, said the building had ''a good pizazz about it'', and while it was not good to fill in the harbour this was ''the exception to the rule''.

Boxes of money always have a 'good pizazz' about them. The scant information I can find of the building design is strange. In the video on the link on the original post it looks translucent (impossible) with a red frame of vertical panels or concrete. From what I can see of the design, it could be dropped in any place on earth and not stand out much nor blend in.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 23 Dec 2009, 15:58 
Offline
Jedi Master
Jedi Master
User avatar

Joined: 01 Mar 2004, 09:07
Posts: 3418
Location: Marvellous Melbourne
Looks OK to me, could have had been better and could have been worse as well:

Image

How it looks now:

Image
Not much there, a bit of a wasteland actually.

_________________
The Collector's Marvellous Melbourne :)

http://www.thecollectormm.com.au/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 23 Dec 2009, 22:56 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member

Joined: 02 Nov 2008, 16:57
Posts: 449
Thanks for posting up the images, Collector.

The wasteland is the area to be redeveloped in stages by the Barangaroo Delivery Authority, of which Lend Lease has the go-ahead for Stage 1. I agree it's crying out for development.
Like Melbourne's Docklands Authority, the BDA is meant to create a cohesive development, but the process seems a bit dodgy to my mind. There is of course the alternative of seeing what the market comes up with and deciding on a case-by-case basis.

Here is an image that indicates what the BDA wants to achieve for their foreshore walk.
Image

L-L could just as easily have proposed to build out into the bay to extend the proposed parkland and move the hotel up toward the bridge a bit, however if you want to build a three storey block of flats, apply for five or six storeys.

If anyone is interested they can check out the official website via the link below:
http://www.barangaroo.com/index.cfm?menu_id=1


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Melbourne Buildings