Melbourne & Australian Architecture Topics

A place to talk about Australian Architecture, Heritage & Planning Issues
It is currently 18 Dec 2017, 21:51




All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 182 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2011, 15:10 
Offline
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 12 Jan 2010, 23:56
Posts: 242
williampitt wrote:
Anyone as impressed as the lady who writes this puff piece ?

International destination ?? I think Myer struggles even for recognition locally these days ....

I don't know about the splendid experience ascending the atrium. Confusing retail trap maybe.

Quote:
Redesign of our retail culture
Rosie Scott
April 26, 2011

The $225million redevelopment was intended to make Myer not only a local landmark but renowned retail destination internationally.

Rosie Scott casts an appreciative eye over the revamp of Myer's iconic Bourke Street store.

ON ANY given evening you may find a happy couple strolling though the recently rejuvenated Myer Bourke Street store, browsing the cookware, nibbling on macarons. Last week, I found one such couple and asked them what they were shopping for. Nothing, apparently: ''We're just here wasting time; isn't that what everyone does in Myer?''

Myer has always been a place to aimlessly wander through, free to gaze and touch, to liberally ''test'' perfumes and, let's be honest, relieve yourself in its bathrooms. People in the city treat Myer like a familiar park; it is as much an urban space as a shop.

NH Architecture has designed the new Myer in a way that embraces this urban significance, opening up the building, allowing the public better physical and visual access through the space. Principal architect Hamish Lyon says they tried to forget about the project as a retail building, rather to think about ''shopping as culture, shopping as public''.

The $225 million redevelopment aims to reinstate iconic status to the historic Myer building, making it a landmark in Melbourne and a renowned retail destination internationally. The project included the careful restoration of the 1920s Bourke Street facade and famous Mural Hall (housing the stunning Females through the Ages by one-armed muralist Napier Waller).

The most dramatic works are the creation of a large central atrium, an entirely new rear facade on Little Bourke Street and a shiny golden roof.

Ascending through the eight-level atrium is a splendid experience. The atrium was intended to be ''like a laneway that bends up into the sky''.


I am impressed a bit by the atrium in the new design,and am even growing fond of the little Bourke facade, which I thought I never would, but not to the point of the religious experience this shop is supposed to give me.
but 'like a laneway that bends up into the sky' is the most rediculous peice of w*nk Iv'e heard in a long time.
Is there anything in Melbourne that won't be compared to a laneway now????

Walking past the Food hall with the smell of roasted nuts, into the doorways on little bourke with the heaters blasting, then into the cold winter streetscape full of old buidlings before rushing across the street into the second store across the road, that was Myer for me. that belongs in the Nostalgia section now though.

_________________
http://melbournefragments.tumblr.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 26 Apr 2011, 18:36 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 01 Dec 2006, 03:20
Posts: 604
twd03 wrote:
Walking past the Food hall with the smell of roasted nuts, into the doorways on little bourke with the heaters blasting, then into the cold winter streetscape full of old buidlings before rushing across the street into the second store across the road, that was Myer for me. that belongs in the Nostalgia section now though.


I very much agree: the Food Court, its smells and the experience, was the central Myer experience for me. Regrettably Myer began running the section down many years ago by steadily getting rid of various hot foods, plus getting rid of the old hot lunch cafeteria on the third floor in favour of a coffee, juice and cakes cafe has made Myer a place I lost interest in going to when I went to the City, because it no longer offers the things that made it special for me.

_________________
Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia is the fear of long words.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2011, 12:03 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member
User avatar

Joined: 27 Aug 2003, 15:12
Posts: 473
Location: CBD
williampitt wrote:
Looks like the facade next door will be restored which is some consolation for the obvious cheap substitute materials of Emporium.

Whatever happened to the whole LH demolition justification of the development "talking" to QV by pointing the elevators toward that corner ? I don't really see this design doing any talking to QV ....


one thing the render plays down a lot is the electronic billboard - it is unlikely to be transparent as shown, and if its anything like the one on Young & Jacksons, it will be very very bright and dominating - doubt it will do any talking to QV, more like attracting moths to the bright light .....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2011, 04:26 
Offline
New Member
New Member

Joined: 28 Apr 2011, 03:17
Posts: 8
twd03 wrote:
Walking past the Food hall with the smell of roasted nuts, into the doorways on little bourke with the heaters blasting, then into the cold winter streetscape full of old buidlings before rushing across the street into the second store across the road, that was Myer for me. that belongs in the Nostalgia section now though.


Melbourne lost its direction (thanks to the people designing most of the large construction projects) some time after the construction of the Docklands Stadium. The radical designs presented in most of the other Docklands Precinct buildings, Federation Square, last decade's gutting of Melbourne Central and now Myer, all seem to be rife with excessive amounts of glass or multi-coloured metallic spheres, triangles, poles and just about any other shape imaginable except for the rectangle.

In my own opinion, Myer's only made two genuine efforts to reinvigorate the Lonsdale St store:

Electronics Department renovation in the mid-to-late 1990s
This change brought about computers and video games, major appliances and home entertainment electronics (TVs, VCRs, DVD players, sound systems etc) into the one location on level 4. It still recided there up until the store's closure, but it was a shadow of its former self.

Sports Department renovation at a similar time to the Electronics renovation
The basement level of both the Bourke and Lonsdale buildings was almost entirely occupied by the green-themed Sports Department. Complete with interactive additions such as golf simulators etc. The level seemed to all-of-a-sudden disappear a few years ago, at a similar time to when electronics and computers started falling apart.

Apart from those two efforts, the following is a list of let-downs by Myer regarding the Lonsdale St store:

Closure of the Roof Top Carnival
I never saw this first-hand, but I've heard stories about it. Up until the late 80s (I think), Myer used to run a sort of mini amusement park on the roof of the Little Lonsdale St-side of the building complex, which was accessible from the famous level-6 Toy Department. Remnants of this can/could be seen by anyone from a surrounding high-rise (eg. Rialto Tower) or by anyone with rooftop access. Astroturf and various paint artifacts are visible even after 20+ years of exposure to Melbourne weather.

Closure of Lonsdale St Level 6 - Toy Department
Back when toy retail was a serious business (more serious than it is today), Myer's Lonsdale Street-facing (Emporium facade) building had its level 6 occupied by a quite-large toy department. It was so popular (especially in the late 80s and early 90s when video games were included in one of its corners) that families (and kids by themselves) would often enter the store in large numbers and do the escalator marathon up to level 6. Most who know it and visited it often usually refer to it with a level of prestige and fame. Myer closed the level down in the late 1990s, blocking off the escalators and covering up the large-scale interactive Monopoly board game on its floor, leaving L6 as office space used by Myer.

Closure of The Cafeteria
As has been mentioned by others here, Myer used to have a serious cafeteria on level 3, adjoining the Book area. The range of food it offered (especially when combined with what was on offer on the ground-floor food level) drew in shoppers and workers from around the city for not only lunch, but when the store was open late, dinner was often eaten there as well. They had the real deal "slide-your-tray-along-the-counter" setup like one of those American high school cafeteries. This was reduced over time until it was emptied, brought back to 20% life, emptied again, brought back to 15% life, and then eventually it was just killed off completely the area used to sell seasonal nick-nacks or general specials.

Closure of The Ground-Floor Food Level
Another one mentioned previously. It sort of tied in with the level-3 cafeteria, but what was on the ground floor without a doubt was responsible for most of Myer Lonsdale's charm and atmosphere. One end of the store, located near the doors, contained a complete roasted nut store (which, when combined with the bakery on the same level, gave Myer Lonsdale its well-known aroma). The other end, once again located near the doors, contained a confectionary counter. The rest of the floor was filled with food counters offering anything from fruit and ice cream to sandwiches and full hot meals. A large amount of menswear also seemed to fit between all of this. This floor survived mostly intact a fair bit longer than the original cafeteria on level 3 did, but make no mistake about it, it was killed off bit-by-bit a few years before the store's closure.

Anyway, there's my slight rant on Myer Lonsdale St. I hope people find it interesting, and I hope that others find some of what I said familiar and feel the same way.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2011, 12:44 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member
User avatar

Joined: 27 Aug 2003, 15:12
Posts: 473
Location: CBD
I have great childhood memories of the rooftop carnival - i recall it was only open at christmas, and the only way there was through the toy department, down odd long corridors, up back stairs, it seemed very hidden, then you were outside ! surrounded by city buildings ! it was really like a magic wonderland, though all i remember was a punch and judy show.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2011, 13:03 
Offline
Elite Member
Elite Member
User avatar

Joined: 16 Sep 2008, 17:20
Posts: 550
I remember the monopoly board!

The rooftop carnival sounds fascinating, anyone got any pictures?

_________________
http://boscoparrasio.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 182 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Melbourne Buildings