Melbourne & Australian Architecture Topics

A place to talk about Australian Architecture, Heritage & Planning Issues
It is currently 24 Jun 2017, 21:30




All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 07 Oct 2015, 01:33 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010, 08:19
Posts: 74
Boroondara sacrifices important Hawthorn heritage area to wanton destruction. The area bounded by Yarra river church street barkers road known as precinct 24 is ear marked for wholesale destruction . Like the remainder of Hawthorn, the western portion of Hawthorn between the Yarra River and Church Street first attracted upper class residents in the 1850s, who had mansions built in generous landscaped grounds and The middle class were arrived soon after constructing smaller-scale detached houses and duplexes. This area has played a significant part in the development of Melbourne and sadly the Boroondara council has kowtowed to the state government and agreed cover the entire area in 10 meter high concrete blocks. the area has already lost a number historic building and stands to loose many more.


Attachments:
DSC_0060-3.jpg
DSC_0060-3.jpg [ 79.5 KiB | Viewed 6220 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 02:27 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010, 08:19
Posts: 74
the 1880 home of John button at 1 oak street Hawthorn is demolished

"Button was born in Ballarat, Victoria, and was educated at The Geelong College and the University of Melbourne, where he graduated in arts and law. He became a prominent barrister and solicitor in Melbourne, and was active in the Australian Labor Party from the late 1950s. In the 1960s he joined a group of other middle-class Labor activists, such as John Cain, Barry Jones, Richard McGarvie, Frank Costigan and Michael Duffy, known as "the Participants," whose objective was to end Left-wing control of the Victorian branch of the Labor Party.

In 1970, the Participants formed an alliance with the federal Labor leader Gough Whitlam and the President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions, Bob Hawke, to bring about intervention in the Victorian branch by the Federal Executive. Button became part of the interim Advisory Council which took over the branch after intervention, and in 1974 he was elected to the Australian Senate as a strong supporter of Whitlam. He remained a backbencher during the remaining 18 months of the Whitlam government.

Button was elected to the Opposition Shadow Ministry in 1976 and was elected Deputy Labor Leader in the Senate in 1977. From 1980 to 1983 he was Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and Shadow Minister for Communications. He was also a member of the Labor National Executive. Button became well known as a parliamentary tactician and for his dry sense of humour.

A close friend of Labor Leader Bill Hayden, Button decided during 1982 that Hayden could not lead the party to victory at the election due in late 1983. When Liberal Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser called a snap election in February 1983, it was Button who told Hayden that he must resign immediately to make way for Bob Hawke.

In 1983, when Hawke became Prime Minister, Button became Minister for Industry and Commerce, a post he held until 1993. During this period Button carried through major changes in industry policy, lowering tariffs and reducing other forms of protectionism. This caused large job losses in manufacturing industry and provoked bitter opposition among Labor's trade union base.

Button was responsible for the Button car plan, which reorganised the Australian car industry in an attempt to make it competitive without tariff protection. One component of the plan was the sharing of models by local manufacturers, for example, Holden shared models with Toyota, and Ford shared models with Nissan. However, badge engineering proved unpopular from buyers, who preferred original models to their rebadged versions, and with manufacturers themselves.[2]

Button resigned from the Senate on 31 March 1993. In retirement he remained active in Labor affairs and published several volumes of amusing memoirs. He also led a number of trade missions, joined company boards and served as a professorial fellow at Monash University.[3] His son James Button is a prominent journalis"


Attachments:
i oak street 2.jpg
i oak street 2.jpg [ 105.19 KiB | Viewed 6168 times ]
1 oak street.jpg
1 oak street.jpg [ 125.55 KiB | Viewed 6168 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 14:57 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 01 Dec 2006, 03:20
Posts: 604
My comment is not about the building but I can say that I met John Button countless times in a work related sense, years ago. Of all the ministers I met he was perhaps the most easy going person and we got along well.

_________________
Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia is the fear of long words.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Oct 2015, 16:59 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010, 08:19
Posts: 74
I visited them when I was a child and played in the garden


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 00:42 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010, 08:19
Posts: 74
A 1906 map showing view of oak street in 1906.


Attachments:
oak map web.jpg
oak map web.jpg [ 173.14 KiB | Viewed 6103 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Oct 2015, 01:21 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010, 08:19
Posts: 74
"Stanmore at 19 Oak Street, Hawthorn, is a substantial two-storey single-fronted Victorian villa of brick
construction. The hipped slate roof has bracketed eaves and overpainted rendered brick chimneys with moulded
caps and antefixa; the rear chimney retains a bichrome Hawthorn brick finish. The principal south (facade) and
west elevations are rendered, while the other walls are brick. All have been overpainted. The south and west
elevations are screened by an impressive double-height verandah with cast iron Corinthian columns, balustrade,
frieze and brackets and non-original tiled floor, which cranks around the canted bay in the side elevation.
The main entrance is via a panelled timber door with leadlight surrounds which is flanked by a single window
opening with arched head and timber-framed double-hung sash window, an arrangement repeated at first floor
level. To the rear of the house is an original single-storey service wing which has been extended to the north with
a large addition.
The property has a relatively recent palisade fence with rendered masonry piers and powdercoated steel panels
and gates. An open carport is constructed between the east elevation and the side fence. With the exception of
the fence, carport, overpainting and rear additions, the house appears otherwise relatively externally intact".


Attachments:
19 oak street.jpg
19 oak street.jpg [ 107.63 KiB | Viewed 6100 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Melbourne Buildings